Trend: The New Textured Tresses

hair
By January 19, 2015 2 Comments

Trend: The New Textured Tresses

Textured Tresses!

Look at any red carpet in the past 3 months and the definitive hair trend you’re bound to notice is texture. After fawning over the textured tresses of ladies like Jennifer Lopez, Sienna Miller, and Emma Stone at the Golden Globes – and recognizing that each of these women has different hair types and lengths – we decided to do a bit more research on this hot hair trend. Redken Brand Ambassador and StyleSeat Advocate, Rodney Cutler, whose clients include Emma Watson, Rachael Ray, Jamie King, and Fergie, schooled us on the ins and outs of all things texture. Yes, everyone can partake in this effortless and uber sexy styling trend.

Why is texture so big right now?

Textured looks are very versatile. They really transform a look and can be edgy or effortless. We’ve seen it as an everyday style and also dressed up for red carpet events like the Golden Globes. Textured looks are super flattering and work on all types and lengths, plus are easy to style at home.

At the Golden Globes, texture was everywhere. How does texture work for different hair lengths and types?

For Short Hair: Adding texture is one of the best styling options for short hair and it’s easy to achieve. Texture has been a trend since the pixie cut became popular and it has remained a trend with new cuts. Many celebrities including Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Mara, and Taylor Swift are showing off their short hair by adding a lot of texture and dimension.
For Long Hair: Long hair is great for textured looks because there are so many styling options for this length. You can achieve beachy waves any season and add volume to your hair with texturizing products. Texture can also be used to add an interesting detail to common, easy-to-do hairstyles like a braid or ponytail, making them into more of a bolder, statement look.
For Different Hair Types: Texture holds best in medium or thick hair, but the same look can still be achieved even with fine hair by using the right products like Redken Move Ability 05 Lightweight Defining Cream Paste, which provides grip and hold to the style.

When we speak about texture, what are we really going for?

Texture is all about giving the hair more volume and movement. Texture can be achieved with effortless waves and curls, by creating a volumized tousled look, or braids that are imperfect. It adds an element of the unexpected when paired with classic silhouettes.

What’s the easiest way to create texture?

The easiest way to create texture is to add a volumizing or texturizing product to wet hair and then use your fingers to rough dry hair with a blow dryer. Then use a curling iron to set, and pull fingers through the curls to complete the look. Textured looks stay best the day after hair has been washed.

What are the 5 best products for all hair types to create texture?

1. Dry Shampoo is great for texture because it refreshes hair for its second day and gives hair extra grip for styling.
Editor’s Picks: Kloraine Dry Shampoo with Oat Milk ($20)
2. Lightweight Defining Cream Paste is perfect for all hair types and helps maintain texture and hold.
Editor’s Picks: Verb Sculpting Cream ($14)
3. Instant Finishing Spray sets hair immediately and should be used after you’ve finished your curls.
Editor’s Picks: Redken Quick Dry 18 Instant Finishing Spray ($19)
4. A Nourishing Hair Oil provides frizz-control and shine.
Editor’s Picks: Balanced Guru No Frizz Oil ($13)
5. Volumizing Mousse adds fullness to hair, which helps hair hold texture. It should be used on damp hair.
Editor’s Picks: Pureology Colour Stylist Silk Bodifier Volumizing Mousse ($19)

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Beauty Banter was launched in July of 2006 as a comprehensive beauty blog covering trends, tips and tricks, insider secrets, and weekly must-haves. Beauty Banter has a reputation of being on the cutting edge of emerging trends and product launches so our readers are always the first to know what’s hot and what’s just not.